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Tag: EmergencyServices

Tech for good: how drone technology is changing emergency rescue missions

By AMELIA HEATHMAN

Drones are being adapted to search for life in burning buildings – here’s how it’s done 

Drones are a controversial tech gadget to say the least.

They can pose a risk to aircraft, cause potential privacy issues, and are being used to smuggle contraband into prisons.

Despite their bad reputation, a lot of research is being put into the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) within emergency missions.

At New York University’s Abu Dhabi campus, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Antonios Tzes, has been manning a project across five different universities in the US, Sweden, Switzerland, Netherlands, and Greece, to develop drones for use inside buildings, particularly in fire situations.
After designing ground vehicles for rescue operations, Tzes and his team were looking for a way to move away from the ground.

“We needed to go up into the air, in confined spaces, and drones were the logical way to do it,” he tells the Standard.

Here’s what you need to know about how drones can be used in rescue missions.

Read More: Evening Standard

Medical Cargo Could Be The Gateway For Routine Drone Deliveries

One shred of solace that surfaced as hurricanes and tropical storms pummeled Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico last fall was the opportunity to see drones realize some of their life-saving potential.

During those disasters unmanned aircraft surveyed wrecked roads, bridges and rail lines. They spotted oil and gas leaks. They inspected damaged cell towers that had left thousands unable to call for help. “Drones became a literal lifeline,” former Federal Aviation Administration chief Michael Huerta told the agency’s drone advisory committee in November.

Read More: National Public Radio