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Month: April 2018

Drone market finally set for take-off after whirl of patents

By BRADLEY GERRARD

Fictional depictions of the 21st century often imagined the skies filled with drones.

But nearly two decades in, this prediction seems far from reality. Even the world’s mightiest of retailers, Amazon, has only trialled deliveries by drone.

But new data suggests we could be on the cusp of change and those fanciful visions of the future might be about to finally take off.

Data from the World Intellectual Property Office for the 2016-2017 financial year shows patents filed for technology related to drones hit a new high of 5,301 – more than quadrupling from the 1,242 the prior year.

Read More: STUFF

DelivAir – Drone deliveries that find you

By Chris Dawson

Everyone in the logistics industry is talking about personalising deliveries and making them more convenient for consumers. The thing is though, while lockers or parcel shops are convenient from the point of view that you can collect your parcel at a time that suits you, you still have to go and collect your parcel.

Equally knowing a parcel will be delivered to your house at a certain time saves you staying in all day, generally you still have to be at home.

The ultimate for the delivery industry is to get to the stage where parcels follow the recipient and are delivered to them in person wherever they are whenever they want to receive the goods. That’s not only expensive but pretty impossible to achieve, although carriers such as DPD will already notice that you’re not home and delay your delivery until you return which is pretty neat.

Redelivery when you’re home is part of DPD Precise. Even Amazon’s new in-car delivery service is limited to new models and only certain car brands

Deliveries that chase you are still the goal however, why do you need to be in a particular place at a set time to receive a parcel? That’s where the boffins at Cambridge Consultants come in. They have developed DelivAir, a drone delivery concept that can deliver a package straight to the hands of its recipient, no matter where they are located… even if they are on the move.

Watch: https://youtu.be/gIUc4hjGBBQ

Read More: Tamebay

Drones delivering blood in emergencies: The future of health care?

We say YES at GPAS this is the future of health care!

(US) – Palo Alto, California, hopes to become the first U.S. city to use unmanned aircraft to deliver blood from a blood bank to a hospital. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is reviewing the city’s proposal, along with about 150 others. The agency will approve 10 projects to move forward next month.

Drones delivering blood in emergencies could be the future of health care. At the Stanford Blood Center in the heart of Silicon Valley, Dr. Tho Pham’s team collects about 200 pints of blood each day. Most of that supply is stored at the hospital, reports CBS News correspondent Mireya Villarreal.

But sometimes, there’s a need for more.

“You can’t plan for emergencies and that’s where time becomes even more crucial,” Pham said.

Right now they use a courier service, but the process can be slow.

“It depends on the time of day, courier availability, traffic conditions, anywhere from 30 to 60 minutes,” Pham said. With a drone, he said, “Ten minutes or less.”

“It’s a huge difference, and it can make a difference in a lot of people’s lives,” he added.

Read More and Watch video: CBS News

How Drones Are Sterilizing Deadly Mosquitoes

Posted By: Jason Reagan

What do drones, radiation and mosquitoes have in common? Two of these things can defeat the other.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) announced this week the successful testing of a drone-based effort to sterilize mosquitoes in an effort to stop the spread of the deadly Zika virus.

In cooperation with the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization, the IAEA and Swiss-American non-profit WeRobotics developed a UAV solution to release the airborne Sterile Insect Technique, a kind of “insect birth control” that deploys radiation to sterilize male mosquitoes.

“The release mechanism for mosquitos has until now been a bottleneck in the application of SIT to control human diseases,” said Jeremy Bouyer, medical entomologist at the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. “The use of drones is a breakthrough, and paves the way for large-scale and cost-efficient releases, also over densely populated areas.”

Read More: Drone Life

Drone market prepares for take-off after whirl of patents

By 

Fictional depictions of the 21st century often imagined the skies filled with drones but nearly two decades in, this prediction seems far from reality.

Even the world’s mightiest of retailers, Amazon, has only trialled deliveries by drone. But new data suggests we could be on the cusp of change and those fanciful visions of the future might be about to finally take off.

Data from the World Intellectual Property Office for the 2016-17 financial year shows patents filed for technology related to drones hit a new high of 5,301 – more than quadrupling from the 1,242 the prior year.

Read More: The Telegraph Business

High tech humanitarians: Drones come to the World Food Program

By PAMELA FALK CBS NEWS

UNITED NATIONS — The U.N.’s World Food Program (WFP) has gone tech-savvy. Drones, the organization said at the U.N. this week, are key to a more advanced fight against hunger and to help humanitarian aid and data collection in places like Cox’s Bazar district in Bangladesh, which has dealt with an influx of Rohingya refugees from neighboring Myanmar.

Enrica Porcari, head of WFP’s Technology Division told CBS News that the use of drones in humanitarian responses is groundbreaking because “it could reduce humanitarian response time from days to hours to even minutes and make delivery of assistance more efficient, accurate and cost-effective.”

“Drones can allow humanitarian agencies to mitigate risks before they turn to disasters,” Porcari said.

The example she gave was Mozambique, where the WFP-supplied drones were able to send data to analyze flood-prone areas and allowed the government’s disaster management agency to move people in areas that will be affected by the floods before it actually reached them, greatly reducing potential loss of life.

Read More: CBS News

Mosquito-packed drones ready to join fight against Zika and other deadly diseases – UN agency

Robotics may soon be a critical ally in the fight against disease-spreading bugs, a United Nations agency said Thursday after a successful test releasing sterile mosquitos from aerial drones as part of efforts to suppress the insect that spreads Zika and other diseases.

The drone-based mechanism overcomes a critical bottleneck in the application of Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) to control insect pests, said the UN International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which developed the system in partnership with the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the non-profit group WeRobotics.

“The use of drones is a breakthrough, and paves the way for large-scale and cost-efficient releases, also over densely populated areas,” said Jeremy Bouyer, medical entomologist at the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture.

SIT, a form of insect birth control, uses radiation to sterilize male mosquitos, which are then released to mate with wild females. As these do not produce any offspring, the insect population declines over time.

However, to be effective, the technique requires the uniform release of large numbers of insects in good condition over a given area.

Read More: UN News

Telstra Eyes Drones For Future Network Revenue

By Roma Christian

As the race to 5G continues, Telstra has revealed it’s eyeing the future of drones for additional mobile network revenue – notably those with built-in SIM cards and radios.

Speaking to The Australian Telstra Chief Technology Officer, Hakan Eriksson, asserts drones hold “interesting” potential for future transport, however, claims there’s currently a “big component missing”.

The missing piece surrounds how users control the unmanned air crafts – a role Telstra has set it sights on:

“We think the mobile network can serve a big part in being the connectivity layer that you can use to communicate with drones and also control drones”

“We usually talk about the drones as just a flying mobile phone because Telstra is very good at talking to mobile phones and if all the drones had a radio and a SIM card in them, they could talk to their infrastructure controller”.

Telstra is reportedly in talks with local civil aviation regulators, over the way in which drones operate beyond regular lines of vision – claimed to be the key to many of their potential benefits.

The news comes as the telco continues to expand its investment in drone technology.

Read More: Channel News

Reducing Pollution with Drones

By Isabelle Robinson

A new study into the potential of use of delivery drones to reduce carbon emissions has been released by the University of Washington.

Drones are known to be more convenient than delivery trucks and are also more efficient. They are becoming more appealing to companies due to their potential for cost and time savings. However, researchers at the University of Washington have found that pollution reduction may not be one of the benefits these flying delivery drones can offer.

Contrary to widespread belief, if delivery drones were used instead of more traditional methods of transport, such as trucks, the estimated carbon emissions may actually increase.

Using Drones for Pollution Control

The university researchers came to this conclusion by weighing up the carbon emissions from delivery drones and trucks. They did this by using already created models that estimate truck pollution data that had been used previously to estimate the environmental impact for grocery delivery services.

Read More: AZO Clean Tech

North Sea operators set to trial advanced inspection UAVs

ABERDEEN, UK – Air Control Entech (ACE) and the Oil & Gas Technology Centre have launched three unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), designed to cut the costs of offshore oil and gas inspection by up to 50%.

Most UAVs offshore are typically used for visual inspection. ACE’s focus with the new systems has been on faster and more accurate inspection.

Read More: OffShore